Culloden Jacobites Not Primitive Savages

Aug 4, 2016 by

Murray Pittock of the University of Glasgow has uncovered evidence he believes shows the Culloden Jacobites were far more professional in their formation and weaponry than has been portrayed in history books.

‘Seldom has the adage that history is written by the victors been more accurate or appropriate than in the case of Culloden.

‘For two centuries after the battle, British historiography framed Jacobitism as primitive because of the threat it posed, and the function the defeat of that threat had in a national narrative of foundational reconciliation and the development of the British Empire.

‘It is no coincidence that this approach has begun to founder since 1970, as the imperial state which grew to maturity in part as a consequence of the defeat of the Jacobite threat has itself taken on more fragmentary, modern and multicultural modes of existence.’

The Battle of Culloden: Culloden Jacobites

The Battle of Culloden: A historian claims Culloden Jacobites were framed in British history as ill-equipped because of the threat they posed – and the function the defeat played in a narrative of the British Empire’s development.

The Jacobite army has long been depicted as poorly-led, ill-disciplined, claymore-wielding Highland savages. No surprise then that they were routed by British redcoats deploying muskets and cannon fire.

But did the victors deliberately miscast the Culloden Jacobites as savages?

 

In this brief video, Professor Pittock explains his theory:

 

Source: Bonny Prince Charlie’s vanquished troops were NOT an army of Highland savages | Daily Mail Online

 

Click HERE to pre-order Dr. Pittock’s new book, Great Battles: Culloden on Amazon.

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Scotland’s Dunnottar Castle

May 11, 2014 by

 

On the north east coast of Scotland, high atop a rocky headland on the North Sea, lie the ruins of a medieval fortress called Dùn Fhoithear. Known as Dunnottar in English, this famous castle is one of the most photographed in Scotland, and with good reason. The views of the castle from land and sea are simply stunning, calling up memories of ancient Picts, medieval Scottish knights and Jacobites, all of whom are connected to the site. Dunnottar was once controlled by the Keiths, who held the peerage title Earl Marischal until the lands and castle were seized by the Crown from the 10th Earl for his role in the Jacobite Rising of 1715. The castle essentially fell into disrepair until it was bought by the Cowdray family in 1925; the family still owns the castle, but it is open to the public.

 

 

The castle played a prominent role in the history of Scotland, and William Wallace, Mary Queen of Scots, the Marquis of Montrose and the future King Charles II all visited Dunnottar at some point during its storied history.

 

 

In November, 1651, Cromwell’s forces laid siege to the castle, seeking the Honours of Scotland (the regalia of crown, sword and sceptre) used during the coronation of Charles II at Scone castle earlier in 1651. The Dunnottar defenders held out for six months against a vastly superior force, until the Honours were safely smuggled out of the castle and secreted beneath the floor of a local church. The Honours, which are the oldest set of crown jewels in the British isles, are now on display at Edinburgh Castle.

 

 

Visitors to Dunnottar can walk from the nearby town of Stonehaven (about two miles) or drive to the small car park near the castle. You must then follow a footpath to the base of the castle headland, and climb a long, steep set of stone stairs to reach the castle grounds.

 

For more information about Dunnottar, its hours of operation and directions, click on the castle website HERE.

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