Death of an Irish Trader

Sep 24, 2013 by

The Irish Trader, by Brens Photos https://www.facebook.com/brens.photos

The Irish Trader, by Brens Photos https://www.facebook.com/brens.photos

The Irish Trader in Baltray with the Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) in the background.
In 1974, the MV Irish Trader left the port of Sharpness in the Bristol Channel, bound for Drogheda carrying a cargo of 410 tonnes of fertilizer, when it ran aground on the soft sands of Baltray Beach, County Louth.

read more

Related Posts

Share This

Mar 28, 2013 by

Dolbadarn Castle guarding the Llanberis Pass, in North Wales.

read more

Related Posts

Share This

Mar 15, 2013 by

Devenish Island, in Lough Erne, County Fermanagh, Northern Island, contains one of the finest monastic sites in Northern Ireland. The small island is accessible only by boat, a safety feature which may have induced the monks to build there. A round tower thought to date from the 12th century is situated on the island, as are the walls of the Oratory of Saint Molaise who established the monastery in the 6th century, on a pilgrim route to Croagh Patrick in County Mayo. It became a center of scholarship and although raided by Vikings in 837 and burned in 1157, it later flourished as the site of the parish church and St Mary’s Augustinian Priory. The round tower is some 30 metres (100 ft) tall and can be climbed using internal ladders. It features a sculptured Romanesque cornice of heads and ornament under the conical stone roof. Nearby is a cross carved with spiral patterns and human heads. There are also several cross-slabs, one with an interlace design and a medieval carved cross. Near the round tower, the foundations of another tower were found, which the present tower probably superseded. Many of the old graves are those of former priests and monks of the Cassidy, Tully and Casey clans.

read more

Related Posts

Share This

Feb 16, 2013 by

Standing stone and church ruins Sarn Meyllyeyrn, Lleyn Peninsula, Wales

read more

Related Posts

Share This

Feb 15, 2013 by

Strome Castle ruins, Loch Carron, Scotland

read more

Related Posts

Share This

Feb 9, 2013 by

Glenbuchat Castle, Aberdeenshire, Grampian, Scotland -built in 1590, The castle was built by the Gordons, an extremely powerful Aberdeenshire family. The Gordon Earl of Huntly led the Catholic Rebellion of 1592, and within two years of completion, Glenbuchat was occupied by the forces of Protestant king James VI. Later Brigadier-General John Gordon of Glenbuchat fought for the Jacobites in both the 1715 and 1745 Risings. In 1746 the General, then 70 years old, led the Gordons and the Farquharsons at the Battle of Culloden. “Old Glenbucket” as he was known was so devoted to the Pretender’s causes that King George II was haunted by him in his dreams, often awakening screaming “De gread Glenbogged is goming!” in his thick German accent. Gordon was hunted after Culloden, but managed to escape to Norway, disquised as a beggar. He died in France. The castle was a ruin by 1738 and sold to the Duff Earl of Fife. James William Barclay bought the castle in 1901, and Colonel James Barclay Milne, his grandson, placed it in state care in 1946. A local club purchased the surrounding parkland in 1948 and gifted it to the state to ensure that the castle’s surroundings would remain intact. Both the castle and the surrounding land are managed by Historic Scotland.

read more

Related Posts

Share This

Feb 9, 2013 by

Termon McGrath Castle, County Donegal, Ireland-built in the 1611 by Miler McGrath, the castle was attacked and destroyed by Cromwell’s troops. Though mcGrath lived to age 100, he never returned to the castle, and it has not been occupied since

read more

Related Posts

Share This