Tartan Reading Glasses With Style

Oct 25, 2014 by

Tartan reading glasses are FINALLY back in stock!

My favorite red tartan reading glasses have garnered many oohs and ahhs since I bought them a couple of years ago.  Unfortunately, they’ve been sold out for months. Now, Amazon has them back– the gorgeous, original red Royal Stewart/Stuart tartan readers and new dark blue and green tartan reading glasses in several strengths.

 

I am of an age where I need to use reading glasses, and enjoy picking out stylish and colorful ones to wear. Having Scottish heritage, I thought I’d buy a pair of tartan reading glasses to sport at the holidays and Scottish festivals I attend each year. Finding good quality, visually attractive tartan reading glasses turned out to be more difficult than I anticipated, even when I broadened my search to include online sources. Just as I was about to give up, I searched Amazon and there they were–festive red tartan reading glasses with a matching case!

You can find reading glasses for as little as a dollar at some stores ( I have a few cheapo pairs), but the hinges usually don’t last long and the optics are often distorted. I took a chance, paid $25 for the red tartan readers and have been well pleased with them ever since they arrived, courtesy of Amazon’s free shipping. I’ve used them hundreds of times over the past two years, wearing them to parties, Scottish Highland games, antique shopping, etc.
They’ve been to Ireland with me twice, surviving my crazy packing, Irish wind and rain, and numerous horse races, festivals and hikes through the rough terrain of western Ireland. When you stumble across a rare standing stone or the ruins of an old castle, you need good readers to reveal the tiny details–like 13th century graffiti on an old castle wall or Celtic circular carvings on an ancient megalith–you might otherwise miss entirely. These tartan reading glasses helped me do all that and more, and still got rave reviews from ladies at the local pubs.

Happily, the manufacturer is now making the tartan reading glasses in a lovely blue and green pattern that is similar to the Black Watch tartan and the Ancient Campbell and Campbell of Loudoun patterns.  Not as festive as the red tartan readers, the new blue and green plaid readers are nonetheless distinctive and elegant.

To purchase either color of tartan reading glasses, click HERE.

They are shipped by Amazon, so you can get free shipping with a qualifying purchase of $35.   These tartan reading glasses SELL OUT QUICKLY, based on my experience, so if you want a pair for Christmas or as a gift for someone, you should order now, before the color and/or strength options become unavailable.

Once your glasses arrive, wear them with Scottish pride–and don’t be surprised by all the people, Scottish or not, who’ll want to know where you got those stunning tartan reading glasses!

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National Tartan Day: Celebrating America’s Scottish Heritage

Apr 5, 2014 by

National Tartan Day is celebrated on April 6th in the United States to honor the many ways Scottish immigrants have contributed to the creation and growth of America.   In 2008, President George W. Bush signed a Presidential Proclamation designating the 6th of April, the date on which the Declaration of Arbroath was signed in 1320, as a day to celebrate Scottish heritage, and Tartan Day events have been steadily increasing ever since.   Although the celebrations are not as widespread or well-attended as Saint Patrick’s Day festivities, large National Tartan Day parades and events are held annually in New York City, St Charles, Missouri, Washington, D.C. and many other cities.

Can’t make it to one of those cities?

Show pride in your Scottish heritage and have your own cèilidh– break out your kilt,  bagpipe music and whisky and invite your friends and family over to rock the tartan!

 

 

 

 

There is some evidence that the ancient Celts wove cloth that looks like what we now think of as tartan, but the use of tartan as an identifying pattern for Scottish clans is a more recent invention.  In the late 16th century,   some historical sources refer to various types of checkered or patterned cloth among the Scottish clans.  By the 18th century, the tartan had become so closely associated with the Highland clans that the British Crown passed the Dress Act of 1746, banning the wearing of tartan, as a means of crushing the rebellious Highlanders and the Jacobite cause.  The Act was repealed in 1782, but by then tartan had become a part of the Scottish national identity and a symbol of Scottish freedom  for all Scots, not just Highlanders.

 

 

 

Not sure about the difference between tartan and plaid?   It’s a question I get asked frequently, especially in connection with clan ancestry research.
Tartan is a pattern on cloth consisting of criss-crossed horizontal and vertical bands in multiple colors, called breacan in Scots Gaelic. In weaving, the warp (the lengthwise yarns) and the weft (the transverse threads which are pulled through the warp yarns) are woven at right angles to each other, creating a distinctive pattern of squares and lines known as a sett.   There are setts for all kinds of things, such as the Scottish clans, several US states, and big companies like Harley Davidson– there’s even a Hello Kitty sett!

Plaid is not the same thing as tartan, although the terms are sometimes used interchangeably in the US.   The word plaid comes from the Scots Gaelic word plaide, meaning blanket, and originally referred to a piece of cloth used as a blanket or as a belted plaid, the original form of a kilt.  In Scotland today, if you ask for a plaid, you’ll likely be shown a piece of tartan designed to be slung over one shoulder or used as a blanket or throw for your bed.

The Grand Marshall at this years NYC Tartan Day parade is Howie Nicholsby, owner of world-famous 21st Century Kilts in Edinburgh and handsome Scotsman. Here’s a video from Howie about the kilt and its history:

 

 

Of course, it’s not  Tartan Day without a few Americans in kilts, right?!

 

 

Kennedy tartan

Kennedy tartan

 

 

 

 

 

US Navy tartan on left and US Army tartan on right, courtesy of Sportkilt

US Navy tartan on left and US Marine tartan on right, courtesy of Sportkilt

 

 

 Have a great National Tartan Day!

Sources and Links:

The Scottish Register of Tartans

This is the first place to look when researching your clan tartan.The Scottish Register of Tartans was established by an act of the Scottish Parliament in 2008, to protect, promote and preserve tartan. The Register is a database of tartan designs, maintained by the National Records of Scotland.

Scottish Tartans Authority-has a large database of info on tartans and clans

Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America,  by James Webb (2005)–great book!

Tartans of Scotland

TartanDay.org

New York Tartan Week

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Valentine’s Day KILTED Eye Candy

Feb 3, 2014 by

 

Looking for an alternative to the same old Valentine’s Day gift of candy? Try some kilted eye candy!  Our 2014 Kilted Up calendar is loaded with kilted guys, and a portion of the proceeds goes to support the Wounded Warrior Project, so you’re actually giving two gifts.  Plus, we’re sharing the love by taking 14% off your total at check out!

Mr March: Kilted Celtic Hottie and Irish Wolfhounds

Mr March: Kilted Celtic Hottie and Irish Wolfhounds

As our March calendar model, Tim, clearly shows–KILTED eye candy is the BEST kind of candy to give a special someone.

Click HERE to order the 2014 KILTED UP calendar, just $14.99 at lulu.com–the perfect gift for a special someone, friends (especially ones who’ve never seen a kiltie!) or family.

SALE!! Take 14% off your total purchase by using code AMOR14 at checkout!

Support our Wounded Warriors AND show off your Scottish heritage by proudly displaying our Men in Kilts calendar!

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Get KILTED UP for Cupid!

Jan 26, 2014 by

Candy and flowers are the old standbys on Valentine’s Day, but this year give something with a real WOW factor–KILTS!   Our 2014 Kilted Up calendar is loaded with kilted guys, and a portion of the proceeds goes to support the Wounded Warrior Project, so you’re actually giving two gifts. Plus, we’re sharing the love by taking 14% off your total at check out!

kiltedvalindex

Click HERE to order the 2014 KILTED UP calendar,  just $14.99 at lulu.com–the perfect gift for a special someone, friends (especially ones who’ve never seen a kiltie!) or family. Preview the calendar HERE.

SALE!! Take 14% off your total purchase by using code AMOR14 at checkout!

Support our Wounded Warriors AND show off your Scottish heritage by proudly displaying our Men in Kilts calendar!

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Give a GIFT SLIP for the KILTED UP 2014 CALENDAR!

Dec 18, 2013 by

Need a gift but think it’s too late to ship? Give a GIFT SLIP for the KILTED UP 2014 CALENDAR!

Kilted Up 2014 Calendar on sale now
Kilted Up 2014 Calendar on sale now

Give the gift of our KILTED UP calendar this year!  Click here>> #BESTGIFTEVER to buy.  

Everyone loves men in kilts and our Kilted Up 2014 calendar features twelve REAL men, wearing real kilts, and looking pretty darn fine. Just $14.99 now at Lulu.com– this year’s calendar sales will go in part to support The Wounded Warrior Project, a well-known charity which benefits America’s wounded veterans.

 

If you need a stocking stuffer or gift, but think it’s too late to ship, CLICK HERE>> Lulu.com, buy our calendar and then click the “print a GIFT SLIP” option at checkout. Print the slip, then GIFT the SLIP in the stocking!

QUICK, EASY and no DRIVING involved!

23gift

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Get Kilted Up For the Holidays!

Nov 27, 2013 by

FREE SHIPPING ON KILTED UP 2014 CALENDARS!

Kilted Up 2014 Calendar on sale now

Kilted Up 2014 Calendar on sale now

Give the gift of our KILTED UP calendar this year! Everyone loves men in kilts, and our Kilted Up 2014 calendar features twelve REAL men, wearing real kilts, and looking pretty darn fine.  Just $14.99 + FREE SHIPPING now at Lulu.com– this year’s calendar sales will go in part to support The Wounded Warrior Project, a well-known charity which benefits America’s wounded veterans.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER now and get  FREE SHIPPING–just use coupon code FREESHIP at check out.

Free shipping on up to 14 items–Set your shipping cost to $0 and check out our amazing calendar of kilted hotties.
Offer ends Dec 15, 2013 at 11:59 PM

Use Code: FREESHIP

OR Stock up and share the love this holiday season–buy 15 or more items and get 20% off

Offer extended through Dec 15, 2013 at 11:59 PM

Coupon Code: CYBERBULK2013

Thanks for supporting Wild Eyed Southern Celt and America’s wounded warriors.

 

Men in Kilts-No Use Putting Up a Fight

Men in Kilts-No Use Putting Up a Fight

Support independent publishing: Buy this calendar on Lulu.

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Feb 6, 2013 by

red tartan heart

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