Jacobite Mansion Up For Sale

Oct 26, 2015 by

The recent listing of an 18th century Jacobite mansion presents a rare opportunity for Scottish history buffs.  If you have a yen to restore a secluded ruin that was a major center of the 1715 Jacobite rebellion, and 150,000 pounds to spend, Grange House may be the fixer upper of your dreams.

 

 

“Grange House East Neuk, Fife, now stands as a secluded historic ruin – looking out across a local golf course and the Firth of Forth.

But 300 years ago the first Jacobite rebellion of 1715 was planned by royal usurper James Malcolm within its walls.

Malcolm built the home in 1708 – and used it as the base for a bloody attempt to replace King George I of Britain with the exiled monarch James VIII and III.

The rebellion failed – and the house was burnt into ruins in the years since – but now any history buff with £150,000 to spare can buy the historic ruins to return them to their former glory.”

Source: For sale: a fixer upper where a plot to overthrow the crown was hatched | Deadline News

 

The land on which Grange House sits was used by local nuns, between the 13th and 16th centuries, as a farm to grow food for the poor. James Malcolm purchased the land in 1708, building himself a grand–and heavily fortified– manor house.

“Fortified with a large surrounding wall on a high vantage point – and with a hidden secret chamber – it is now widely accepted that the house was built as a military base for his cause.

And it was within the walls of the house that the Jacobite rebellion of 1715 was planned to seize Scotland back from George I. The rebellion officially began in August of 1715 – when the banner of James was raised in Aberdeenshire.

By October the 20,000 Jacobites had taken all of Scotland north of the Firth of Forth – but after an indecisive and bloody battle at Sheriffmuir the rebellion lost its momentum and floundered.

After the rebellion many Jacobites were taken prisoner, tried for treason and sentenced to death, and Malcolm was forced to forfeit his possessions and his home to the crown.”

Source: For sale: a fixer upper where a plot to overthrow the crown was hatched | Deadline News

Restoration of the Jacobite mansion will require adherence to a strict set of regulations set by local authorities. Materials will have to be historically accurate and match the existing ruins of Grange house.

The rewards, however, are potentially great: a beautiful, historic piece of Scotland with a view of the Firth of Forth and enough stories to pass down for generations to come.

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Scotland’s Dunnottar Castle

May 11, 2014 by

 

On the north east coast of Scotland, high atop a rocky headland on the North Sea, lie the ruins of a medieval fortress called Dùn Fhoithear. Known as Dunnottar in English, this famous castle is one of the most photographed in Scotland, and with good reason. The views of the castle from land and sea are simply stunning, calling up memories of ancient Picts, medieval Scottish knights and Jacobites, all of whom are connected to the site. Dunnottar was once controlled by the Keiths, who held the peerage title Earl Marischal until the lands and castle were seized by the Crown from the 10th Earl for his role in the Jacobite Rising of 1715. The castle essentially fell into disrepair until it was bought by the Cowdray family in 1925; the family still owns the castle, but it is open to the public.

 

 

The castle played a prominent role in the history of Scotland, and William Wallace, Mary Queen of Scots, the Marquis of Montrose and the future King Charles II all visited Dunnottar at some point during its storied history.

 

 

In November, 1651, Cromwell’s forces laid siege to the castle, seeking the Honours of Scotland (the regalia of crown, sword and sceptre) used during the coronation of Charles II at Scone castle earlier in 1651. The Dunnottar defenders held out for six months against a vastly superior force, until the Honours were safely smuggled out of the castle and secreted beneath the floor of a local church. The Honours, which are the oldest set of crown jewels in the British isles, are now on display at Edinburgh Castle.

 

 

Visitors to Dunnottar can walk from the nearby town of Stonehaven (about two miles) or drive to the small car park near the castle. You must then follow a footpath to the base of the castle headland, and climb a long, steep set of stone stairs to reach the castle grounds.

 

For more information about Dunnottar, its hours of operation and directions, click on the castle website HERE.

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