Mar 30, 2013 by

Illiam Dhône (14 April 1608 – 02 January 1663) was a Manx nationalist and politician who was executed by firing squad at Hango Hill in the Isle of Man on 2nd January 1663. The name Illiam Dhône translates from Manx to English as Brown William the name given to him because of his hair colour. His name in English was William Christian. Illiam Dhône was appointed Receiver General of the Isle of Man in 1648. At the time of the Civil War James Stanley 7th Earl of Derby was a loyalist supporter of King Charles I. In 1651 he left the Island to fight for the English King against the Parliamentary forces. He was captured and his wife Countess Charlotte de la Tremouille hoped to try and negotiate her husband’s release by holding out against the surrender of the Island’s garrisons. However, Illiam Dhône in an act known as the Manx Rebellion gave up her remaining forces to those of Parliament who at the time had besieged the Island. James Stanley had by this time been executed. On the restoration of King Charles II in 1660 the 8th Earl of Derby and only son of James Stanley and Countess Charlotte de la Tremouille returned to the Isle of Man. He accused Illiam Dhône of treason despite the issue of a general pardon granted by Charles II. At his trial many members of the House of Keys who refused to condemn him were replaced by those that would. His execution was carried out on 2 January 1663.

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Mar 27, 2013 by

Snowy sheep on the Isle of Man

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Mar 21, 2013 by

The Northern Lights over The Isle of Man photographed by James Brew in Smeale

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Mar 20, 2013 by

Peel Castle, Isle of Man Situated in Peel, Isle of Man originally constructed by Vikings. The castle stands on St Patrick’s Isle which is connected to the town by causeway. It is now owned by Manx National Heritage and is open to visitors. The castle was built in the 11th century by the Vikings, under the rule of King Magnus Barelegs. While there were older stone Celtic monastic buildings on the island, the first Viking fortifications were built of wood. The prominent round tower was originally part of the Celtic monastery, but has had battlements added at a later date. In the early 14th century, the majority of the walls and towers were built primarily from local red sandstone, which is found abundantly in the area. After the rule of the Vikings, the castle continued to be used by the church due to the cathedral built there – the see of Sodor Diocese – but was eventually abandoned in the 18th century. The castle remained fortified and new defensive positions were added as late as 1860. The buildings within the castle are now mostly ruined, but the outer walls remain intact. Excavations in 1982-87 revealed an extensive graveyard as well as the remains of Magnus Bareleg’s original wooden fort. The most spectacular finds were the 10th century grave of “The Pagan Lady” which included a fine example of a Viking necklace and a cache of silver coins dating from about 1030. The Castle’s most famous “resident” is the so called Moddey Dhoo or Black Dog ghost. Peel Castle is sometimes confused with Piel Castle, located on Piel Island, around 30 miles to the east in the Irish Sea.This particularly occurs in reference to the William Wordsworth poem describing Piel, spelling its name as ‘Peele’. Further confusion is added by the fact that Wordsworth is documented as having visited Peel Castle, and wrote about the Isle of Man on a number of times.

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Mar 20, 2013 by

Members of the Manx Detectorists Society have found fragments of the hilt of a Viking Period display sword. It’s cast in bronze with rich Borre Style decoration (c. AD 850-1000) and silver wire frills. Though settled by the Norsemen from about AD 800 onward, the island has not previously produced very manyany of their swords.

http://scienceblogs.com/aardvarchaeology/

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Feb 20, 2013 by

Isle of Man

The International Isle of Man TT (Tourist Trophy) Race is a motorcycle racing event held on the Isle of Man and was for many years the most prestigious motorcycle race in the world. The event was part of the FIM Motorcycle Grand Prix World Championship during the period 1949–1976 before being transferred to the United Kingdom after safety concerns and run by the FIM as the British Grand Prix for the 1977 season. The Isle of Man TT Races became part of the TT Formula 1 Championship from 1977 to 1990 to preserve the event’s racing status. From 1989 the racing has been developed by the Isle of Man Department of Tourism as the Isle of Man TT Festival.

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Feb 20, 2013 by

Peel Castle on the Isle of Man

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