Ruined Wales

Jun 8, 2015 by

Want to know where to go to see the best of ruined Wales?

 

David Hamilton has a new book, Wild Ruins, that has an extensive list of the most mysterious, most beautiful of Wales’ ruined castles, abbeys and keeps.

 

Here’s an excerpt from a Wales Online article about this new guide to exploring ruined Wales:

 

From crag-top castles to crumbling quarries in ancient forests, here’s how to find ruined Wales in all its mysterious glory with the help of author David Hamilton’s book, Wild Ruins.

The substantial remains of Neath Abbey lie on the banks of the gentle flowing waters of the Tennant Canal. It was a favourite of the Romantics and is still a very beautiful place to have a picnic. It was founded in the year 1130, and absorbed by the Cistercian order in 1147. At one time it would have been one of the largest and most powerful abbeys in Wales. You can see the extensive remains of the abbey and a 16th-century mansion.

 

Paddle in the river, climb up the steep hill to Clun Castle and relax in one of the many pubs or cafés in the village of Clun. Built in the 11th century, the powerful Marcher castle defended the English-Welsh border during the Norman occupation.

Much of the large keep still stands high on this naturally occurring knoll overlooking the Saxon village. It’s also not too far from the Offa’s Dyke Path and the Shropshire Way walking routes.

Read more here: 13 incredible Welsh ruins frozen in time forever – Wales Online

To purchase David Hamilton’s Wild Ruins, in either book or Kindle format, click HERE.

read more

Related Posts

Share This

An Irish Proverb

Jan 5, 2014 by

A cabin with plenty of food is better than a hungry castle.    Irish Proverb

indexcabin proverb

Being “house proud”, as my grandmother used to say, makes you look important, but does little to feed hungry bellies.

~The image is of a small stone cottage in County Mayo, Ireland,  photographed by me on a cold, sunny day in May, 2013.  I was intrigued by the pots of geraniums in the window, placed there by someone, even though the home was abandoned and the roof was gone.  It seemed to me to be symbolic of the will of the Irish people to survive and thrive, in spite of all the hardships and tragedies brought to their doorsteps throughout the centuries.

read more

Edinburgh Castle, Scotland’s Iconic Fortress

Nov 2, 2013 by

For the third year in a row, Scotland’s magnificent Edinburgh Castle has been voted the top heritage site in the UK. If you have ever toured the castle, you’ll know why this ancient beauty continues to intrigue visitors from all over the world.

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

Fiona Hyslop, the Scottish Government’s Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs said:

“To win this prestigious award three times in a row confirms that Edinburgh Castle’s fascinating history, dramatic location and panoramic views have an enduring appeal for visitors of all ages both in the UK and around the world.”

http://bbc.in/HyEqy1

The fortress stands on a volcanic plug of basalt, known as Castle Rock, and dominates the Edinburgh skyline. The rock was once home to a late Bronze age people and archaeological evidence shows it was also the site of an Iron Age hill fort or broch.

read more

Feb 1, 2013 by

arrow loop from the South Gatehouse at Beaumaris Castle, Wales Welsh archers were among the first Celts to adapt the longbow to their manner of warfare. By the end of the 15th century, the Welsh were praised and feared as the most accurate—and deadly— archers in the Isles. The death of Offrid in 633 by an arrow from a (Welsh?) longbow precedes its widespread use hundreds of years later by the armies of the English and Norman rulers. There is reliable evidence of its military use by the Welsh in an ambush of invading Saxon horsemen in the Welsh mountains by Welsh longbow archers in 1054. The archers shot so accurately and strongly that the Saxons fled before they could throw their spears. At the siege of Abergavenny in 1182, Welsh archers, using longbows, pierced an oak door four inches thick with their arrows and William de Braose was hit by a Welsh arrow. This arrow went through his chain mail, into his thigh, through the saddle and penetrated the horse he was riding. King Edward 1 recognized that the Welsh archers excelled in the use of the longbow and this was developed by the use of this superb weapon by the Welsh during the military campaigns of the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries.

read more

Related Posts

Share This

Feb 1, 2013 by

Ross Castle in Killarney, Co Kerry, Ireland at sunrise

read more

Related Posts

Share This

Feb 3, 2012 by

adialogue:

What could I possibly tell you about Eilean Donan Castle that you don’t already know…

It’s one of, if not the, most photographed castle in Scotland, giving competition to the dramatically located Urquhart Castle on the Banks of Loch Ness and the equally spectacular Edinburgh Castle, guardian of a great and historic city.  What is it about this castle we love so much?  It sits on a confluence of three sea lochs, Loch Duich, Loch Long and Loch Alsh, looking toward the Isle of Skye.  Its island position gives it a romantic aura but there’s been bloodshed and suffering in the life that runs through its veins.  Brought to the ground and left to neglect, it took the vision of one MacRae with fortitude (their motto) to ressurect it to glory.  He dedicated his life to this task.  For me Eilean Donan will forever be a beacon, a reminder that home is not far – there is rest for us all one day.  

This unqiue photo comes from Stuart Blance (Facebook) and compels us to remember, it’s not romance that builds castles, it’s the strength of the stone, the determination in the mortar to hold together and the fortitude to endure over time.)   

read more

Related Posts

Share This