Mar 31, 2013 by

The view west from Clun Castle across the river Clun toward Wales. Clun Castle was built by the Normans in 1090 as a defence against the Welsh.

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Mar 27, 2013 by

Spring at Caerphilly Castle, Wales

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Mar 26, 2013 by

wanderlusteurope:

Roscommon, Ireland

Once Upon An Irish Fairytale….
the folly castle ruins on Castle Island

Lough Key (Irish: Loch Cé) is a lake in Ireland. It is located in the northwest of County Roscommon, northeast of the town of Boyle. The name Lough Key, derives from Ce’, the druid of Nuadha of the Silver Arm, King of the Tuatha de Danann, who, according to legend, was drowned when the waters of the lake burst forth from the Earth.
The lake is several kilometers across and contains over thirty wooded islands including Castle Island, Trinity Island, Orchard Island, Stag Island, Bullock Island, and Drumman’s Island. Castle Island has had a number of structures built on it over the centuries. The earliest record dates to 1184, in the Annals of Loch Cé, where a lighting strike is reported to have started a fire in “The Rock of Loch-Cé,” a “very magnificent, kingly residence.” The remains of a Franciscan Priory can be seen on Church Island and Castle Island has traces of the once mighty homestead of the Mc Greevy and Mc Dermot Clan. The McDermots ruled this area until the 17th century when it was granted to the King family under the Cromwellian settlement. The folly castle was built in the early 19th century by the King family and still stands on the island.

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Mar 25, 2013 by

Sitting high above the surrounding County Tipperary countryside, the majestic ruins of The Rock of Cashel was once the seat of the King of Munster

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Mar 25, 2013 by

Dunseverick Castle, County Antrim. Submitted by Barry McQueen Read more: http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/tourism/love-it-film-it-share-it-places-amp-spaces-16155653.html?action=Popup&ino=10#ixzz26Z4vWGyt

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Mar 20, 2013 by

Peel Castle, Isle of Man Situated in Peel, Isle of Man originally constructed by Vikings. The castle stands on St Patrick’s Isle which is connected to the town by causeway. It is now owned by Manx National Heritage and is open to visitors. The castle was built in the 11th century by the Vikings, under the rule of King Magnus Barelegs. While there were older stone Celtic monastic buildings on the island, the first Viking fortifications were built of wood. The prominent round tower was originally part of the Celtic monastery, but has had battlements added at a later date. In the early 14th century, the majority of the walls and towers were built primarily from local red sandstone, which is found abundantly in the area. After the rule of the Vikings, the castle continued to be used by the church due to the cathedral built there – the see of Sodor Diocese – but was eventually abandoned in the 18th century. The castle remained fortified and new defensive positions were added as late as 1860. The buildings within the castle are now mostly ruined, but the outer walls remain intact. Excavations in 1982-87 revealed an extensive graveyard as well as the remains of Magnus Bareleg’s original wooden fort. The most spectacular finds were the 10th century grave of “The Pagan Lady” which included a fine example of a Viking necklace and a cache of silver coins dating from about 1030. The Castle’s most famous “resident” is the so called Moddey Dhoo or Black Dog ghost. Peel Castle is sometimes confused with Piel Castle, located on Piel Island, around 30 miles to the east in the Irish Sea.This particularly occurs in reference to the William Wordsworth poem describing Piel, spelling its name as ‘Peele’. Further confusion is added by the fact that Wordsworth is documented as having visited Peel Castle, and wrote about the Isle of Man on a number of times.

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Mar 20, 2013 by

A mass of bluebells growing in Culzean Castle Country Park, Ayrshire.

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