Apr 15, 2013 by

Pennard Castle is a ruined 12th century castle, west of the village of Pennard in the Gower Peninsula, in south Wales.

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Mar 26, 2013 by

wanderlusteurope:

Roscommon, Ireland

Once Upon An Irish Fairytale….
the folly castle ruins on Castle Island

Lough Key (Irish: Loch Cé) is a lake in Ireland. It is located in the northwest of County Roscommon, northeast of the town of Boyle. The name Lough Key, derives from Ce’, the druid of Nuadha of the Silver Arm, King of the Tuatha de Danann, who, according to legend, was drowned when the waters of the lake burst forth from the Earth.
The lake is several kilometers across and contains over thirty wooded islands including Castle Island, Trinity Island, Orchard Island, Stag Island, Bullock Island, and Drumman’s Island. Castle Island has had a number of structures built on it over the centuries. The earliest record dates to 1184, in the Annals of Loch Cé, where a lighting strike is reported to have started a fire in “The Rock of Loch-Cé,” a “very magnificent, kingly residence.” The remains of a Franciscan Priory can be seen on Church Island and Castle Island has traces of the once mighty homestead of the Mc Greevy and Mc Dermot Clan. The McDermots ruled this area until the 17th century when it was granted to the King family under the Cromwellian settlement. The folly castle was built in the early 19th century by the King family and still stands on the island.

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Mar 25, 2013 by

Sitting high above the surrounding County Tipperary countryside, the majestic ruins of The Rock of Cashel was once the seat of the King of Munster

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Mar 20, 2013 by

Ardvreck Castle, Scotland The castle is thought to have been constructed around 1590 by the Clan MacLeod family who owned Assynt and the surrounding area from the 13th century onwards. Indeed Sutherland, the area in which Ardvreck is situated, has long been a stronghold of the clan MacLeod. The most well known historical tale concerning the castle is that on April 30th 1650 James Graham, the Marquis of Montrose, was captured and held at the castle before being transported to Edinburgh for trial and execution. Montrose was a Royalist, fighting on the side of Charles I against the Covenanters. Defeated at the Battle of Carbisdale, he sought sanctuary at Ardvreck with Neil MacLeod of Assynt. At the time, Neil was absent and it is said that his wife, Christine, tricked Montrose into the castle dungeon and sent for troops of the Covenanter Government. Montrose was taken to Edinburgh, where he was executed on 21 May 1650, using the traditional method for traitors: hanging, drawing and quartering. Ardvreck Castle was attacked and captured by the Clan MacKenzie in 1672, who took control of the Assynt lands. In 1726 they constructed a more modern manor house nearby, Calda House, which takes its name from the Calda burn beside which it stands. The house burned down under mysterious circumstances one night in 1737 and both Calda House and Ardvreck Castle stand as ruins today.

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Feb 18, 2013 by

Old Keiss Castle ruins, Scotland

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Feb 8, 2013 by

Dough Castle ruins, Lahinch, Ireland This tower house is a rather precarious single wall standing four storeys high. The castle here was built by the O’Connors in 1306 and it remained a stronghold for the family until the Elizabethan Era. By 1584, the castle was held by the O’Briens. Almost a century later, the building was described as a tall battlemented tower with a two-story house attached to it, still standing, since a Cromwellian officer saved the castle from demolition. The current castle is very ruined, and has suffered several collapses in the 19th century. It was build on poor foundations, which probably can be blamed for the current ruinous state. Almost a century later, the building was described as a tall battlemented tower with a two-story house attached to it, still standing, since a Cromwellian officer saved the castle from demolition. The current castle is very ruined, and has suffered several collapses in the 19th century. It was build on poor foundations, which probably can be blamed for the current ruinous state.

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